Ph.D. IN HISPANIC STUDIES

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Application Deadlines:

The Department of Hispanic Studies is not currently offering an MA program for new applicants. We are no longer accepting applications for Fall 2013, as of 12/15/12, and we do not admit students in the Spring or the Summer. Applications for our Ph.D. Program for Fall 2014 will be open for submission beginning August 1, 2013. The deadline for Fall 2014 admission is December 15, 2013. If you have concerns or questions about these deadlines, please contact the Director of Graduate Studies, Dr. Hilaire Kallendorf at h-kallendorf@tamu.edu.


OVERVIEW

The Department of Hispanic Studies welcomes you to the Hispanic Studies Ph.D. program homepage. The Ph.D. in Hispanic Studies is a doctoral program at Texas A&M University, delivered in collaboration with Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi, Texas A&M International University - Laredo, and Texas A&M University - Kingsville. This site contains information about the program, coursework, faculty, staff and contact information.

The interdisciplinary Ph.D. cooperative program in Hispanic Studies is grounded in a solid knowledge of the language, culture, and literature of Spanish-speaking people and is designed to meet the needs of selected students who enter the program with well-defined goals for their course of study. The program permits a student to integrate the subject matter of different disciplines into a course of study relevant to his or her specific interests in the national and international Hispanic world.


  • Courses Offered - Spring 2013

  • HISP-603 Development of Spanish Language (R 5:30-8:20pm)
  • HISP-607 Seminar in Hispanic Linguistics (W 2:20-5:10pm)
  • HISP-630 Studies in Latin American Literature (M 5:30-8:00pm)
  • HISP-640 Historic Ideas in the Hispanic World (T 5:30-8:00pm)

    Courses Offered - Fall 2013

  • HISP-600 Intro to Hispanic Studies (T 5:30-8:30)
  • HISP-614 Hispanic Dialectology (W 2:20-5:10)
  • HISP-618 Hispanic Folklore and Popular Literature (W 5:30-8:20)
  • HISP-625 U.S. Hispanic Literature and Culture (M 5:30-8:20)
  • HISP-689 Special Topics-Don Quijote and the Arts (R 5:30-8:20)


  • For more information, please contact:

    Dr. Hilaire Kallendorf
    Director of Graduate Studies
    Department of Hispanic Studies
    Texas A&M University
    4238 TAMU
    College Station, TX 77843-4238
    Phone: (979) 458-0621
    Fax: (979) 845-6421
    E-mail: h-kallendorf@tamu.edu

    Admission to Texas A&M University and any of its sponsored programs is open to qualified individuals regardless of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, or educationally unrelated handicaps.



    PROGRAM INFORMATION

    Contents:

    Introduction

    The interdisciplinary Ph.D. cooperative program in Hispanic Studies is grounded in a solid knowledge of the language, culture, and literature of Spanish-speaking people and is designed to meet the needs of selected students who enter the program with well-defined goals for their course of study. The program permits a student to integrate the subject matter of different disciplines into a course of study relevant to her or his specific interests in the national and international Hispanic world. The program focuses on the transcultural and the transnational, as it explores the continuous interchanges between Spanish-speaking countries on both sides of the Atlantic, as well as their interaction with other cultures and languages worldwide. As such, Hispanic Studies pays particular attention to the diasporic experience born out of a history of those successive moments of colonization, expulsion, migration, and exile which have resulted in an endless process of cultural contact and miscegenation. Therefore, even as it engages in the study of national and regional literatures and cultures, Hispanic Studies also seeks to trace the global connections between the different areas in the Hispanic world.

    The graduate cooperative program in Hispanic Studies is characterized by both rigor and flexibility. It is rigorous enough for comprehensive preparation in a specific discipline, and flexible enough to allow students to focus on additional areas of interest. The combination of rigor and flexibility reflects two complementary trends in the occupational marketplace. Employment in traditional language and literature departments is typically limited to specialists with specializations and proficiency in Spanish. On the other hand, opportunities in non-academic careers in public and private sector organizations dealing with Latin America and the Hispanic world require a well-rounded preparation in a variety of Hispanic Studies areas. The graduate of this proposed Hispanic Studies Ph.D. cooperative program will have the single discipline competence needed to qualify for an academic appointment in Spanish, Hispanic Studies, or a related discipline, as well as the broadly based expertise in Hispanic Studies essential to hold leadership positions in government agencies, public service, educational institutions, and foundations.

    Description of the Program (See HISP Ph.D Proposal)

    The Ph.D. in Hispanic Studies will be open to admitted graduate students at the campuses of College Station, Laredo, Kingsville, and Corpus Christi. It consists of one curriculum and one set of overarching educational objectives. Within the general framework of the curriculum, however, there are four concentrations, each of which overlap. Every Ph.D. student must take a core of four courses that will introduce him or her to the various methods and resources for the study of Hispanic literature, language, culture, and socio-economic issues; the research and methodological skills necessary to conduct and present research; the linguistic variations of the Southwest; and U.S. Latino/a literature(s). Once a student has chosen a particular concentration, he or she will be required to take 15 hours of courses in that concentration, and 18 hours of prescribed and free electives.

    The four concentrations are as follows.

    1. Hispanic Linguistics
    2. Spanish Studies
    3. Latin American Studies
    4. U.S. Hispanic Studies

    See HISP Ph.D Proposal

    Admission Standards

    Admission to the doctoral program will be predicated on several factors: (1) a completed masters degree in Spanish or Hispanic Studies or in a related area, with a minimum grade point average of 3.2; (2) demonstrated oral and written proficiency in Spanish; (3) the Graduate Record Examination (GRE); (4) at least three letters of recommendation; (5) the student's goals and career interests as stated on the application form; and (6) the availability of faculty members who are qualified to direct the student's program of study. Admission will be consistent with House Bill 1641.

    Alternatively, students holding an appropriate baccalaureate degree (including a minimum of twelve hours in Spanish at the advanced undergraduate level) could be admitted to the program under the same criteria 2-6 outlined above. These students will need to complete an additional 30.0 hours at the graduate level.

    Residency Requirement

    Residence requirements for the doctoral program can be satisfied by completing two consecutive semesters (at a minimum of nine resident credit hours each) either on campus or through distance education courses originating from the College Station campus and available at all System campuses.

    All students are expected to work under the continuous direction of their graduate committees.

    Texas A&M University Texas A&M University Corpus Christi Texas A&M University Kingsville Texas A&M International
    • Victor Arizpe
    • Norma Arizpe
    • Richard Curry
    • Eduardo Espina
    • Sefano Franchi
    • Juan Carlos Galdo
    • Brian Imhoff
    • Hilaire Kallendorf
    • Alessandra Luiselli
    • Stephen Miller
    • Francisca Miller
    • Sarah M. Misemer
    • Tim Mitchell
    • Alberto Moreiras
    • Bertin Ortega
    • Tim Mitchell
    • Eduardo Urbina
    • José P. Villalobos
    • Irene Moyna
    • Esther Quintana
    • Alain Lawo-Sukam
    • Veronica Loureiro-Rodriguez
    • Javier Villarreal
    • Jesus Rosales
    • Michelle R. Johnson-Vela
    • Pilar Rus
    • Roberto Vela Córdova
    • José Cardona-Lopez
    • Ray Keck, III
    • Irma Cantu
    • Agustín Martínez-Samos
    • Manuel Broncano
    • Cristina Garrigos

    Ph.D. Degree Plan

    Below are the degree requirements for the Ph.D. in Hispanic Studies.

    Ph.D. in Hispanic Studies Summary of Degree Requirements

    For students entering the program with a masters degree:

    Courses required of all students 12 SCH
    Courses prescribed for students by concentration 15 SCH
    Prescribed elective courses in Hispanic Studies 12 SCH
    Free elective courses 6 SCH
    Dissertation hours 19 SCH
    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS FOR THE DEGREE 64 SCH

    For students entering the program with a baccalaureate degree:

    Additional hours 30 SCH
    Courses required of all students 12 SCH
    Courses prescribed for students by concentration 15 SCH
    Prescribed elective courses in Hispanic Studies 12 SCH
    Free elective courses 6 SCH
    Dissertation hours 21 SCH
    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS FOR THE DEGREE 96 SCH



    1. Courses required of all students in the Ph.D. program: [12 SCH]
      HISP 600 Introduction to Hispanic Studies
      HISP 620 Studies in Critical Theory
      HISP 625 U.S. Hispanic Literature and Culture
      HISP 601 Research, Theory and Writing
      or
      SPAN 5300 Theory of Literary Analysis (Texas A&M International University)
      or
      SPAN 6301 Research Methods (Texas A&M University-Kingsville)
    2. Courses prescribed for students by concentration: [15 SCH]

      Concentration courses in the four areas of Hispanic Studies. After consultation with his or her graduate advisor and Ph.D. Committee, the student must chose 15 SCHs in one of the four areas of study offered.

    3. Prescribed elective courses in Hispanic Studies: [12 SCH]

      Students, in consultation with their graduate advisor and Ph.D. committee, are strongly encouraged to take four courses (12 SCHs) in courses taught outside of the Spanish-taught classes offered by their home department. These prescribed courses will be courses taken at the student's home campus. It is recognized that the student will work with his or her graduate advisor in crafting the 12 SCHs in prescribed elective courses for his or her individual degree plan.

      1. Hispanic History and Anthropology
        ANTH 620 Prehistory of Texas
        ANTH 622 Folklore Forms and Methods
        HIST 615 Colonial Latin America
        HIST 617 Latin America: The National Period
        HIST 5320 Problems in Latin American History (Texas A&M International University)
        HIST 5321 Early Nineteenth Century Mexican History (Texas A&M International University)
        HIST 5322 Late Nineteenth Century Mexican History (Texas A&M International University)
        HIST 5360 Seminar in Border History (Texas A&M International University)
        HIST 5328 Seminar in Mexican American History (Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi)
        HIST 5351 Readings Seminar: Colonial Mexico (Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi)
        HIST 6311 History of the Mexican American (Texas A&M-Kingsville)
      2. Hispanic Social Issues and Policy
        BUSH 606 --------
        EDAD 618 Educational Administration in Cross Cultural Environments
        POLS 624 Seminar in Regional Studies (Americas, Latin America, Hispanic Southwest/Border)
        PSYC 633 Gender and Minority Issues in Clinical Psychology
        SOCI 617 Comparative Ethnic Relations
        SOCI 660 --------
        PSCI 5373 Advanced Seminar in Latin American Politics (Texas A&M International University)
        MXAS 5310 Seminar in Mexican American Themes (Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi)
        MXAS 5320 Seminar in Mexican American Origins (Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi)
        POLS 5340 The Government and Politics of Mexico (Texas A&M-Kingsville)
        SOCI 6301 Sociology of the Mexican American (Texas A&M-Kingsville)
      3. Ethnic Studies/Bilingualism
        EPSY 612 Content-Area Instruction for Hispanic Bilingual Programs
        EPSY 613 Spanish/English Biliteracy
        EPSY 616 Spanish for Bilingual and Dual Language
        ENGL 651 Southwestern Literature
        ENGL 679 American Ethnic Literature
        SOCI 617 Comparative Ethnic Relations
        SOCI 660 Theories of Race and Ethnic Group Relations
        COMM 645 Rhetorical Theory
        COMM 654 History and Theory of Rhetoric to 1800
        PHIL 630 Aesthetics
        PHIL 640 Epistemology
        PHIL 658 Philosophy of Language
        SOCI 657 Seminar in Culture
        SOCI 667 Seminar in Race and Ethnic Relations
        EDCI 610 Second Language Assesment and Development
        EDCI 611 Teaching English as a Second Language
        EDCI 612 Bilingual/ESL Content- Area Instructions
        EDCI 616 Teaching Spanish in the Bilingual Classroom
        EDCI 640 Language/Literacy for Bilingual/Multicultural Young Learners
        EDCI 642 Multicultural Education: Theory, Research and Practice
        EDCI 650 The Bilingual/Multicultural Young Child in Family and Culture
        EDCI 651 Bilingual/Multicultural Early Childhood Education
        EDBE 5110 History and Philosophy of Bilingual Education (Texas A&M International University)
        EDBE 5324 Bilingual/Multicultural Teaching Strategies (Texas A&M International University)
        EDBE 5326 Teaching Reading and Language Arts in Spanish (Texas A&M International University)
        ENGL 5303 Problems in American Literature: Chicano/a Literature (Texas A&M International University)
        SOCI 5309 Biculturalism (Texas A&M International University)
        BIEM 5343 Foundations in Bilingual Education (Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi)
        BIEM 5344 Methods of Teaching Bilingual Children (Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi)
        BIEM 5346 Pedagogical Implications of Bilingual/ESL (Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi)
        MXAS 5320 Seminar in Language and Linguistics (Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi)
        MXAS 5699 Mexican American Language (Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi)
        SPED 5385 Foundations in Language Minority Special Education (Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi)
        EDBL 6301 Foundations of Bilingual Education I (Texas A&M-Kingsville)
        EDBL 6302 Foundations of Bilingual Education II (Texas A&M-Kingsville)
        EDBL 6310 Literature of the Mexican American (Texas A&M-Kingsville)
        EDBL 6332 Teaching Spanish Language Skills (Texas A&M-Kingsville)
        EDBL 6334 Teaching Subject Matter in Spanish (Texas A&M-Kingsville)
    4. Free elective courses: [6 SCH]

      Students may choose, in consultation with their graduate advisor and Ph.D. committee, two courses (6 SCH) from any of the courses listed in the concentration areas above or other courses appropriate to their academic field of study. Students must select these courses in consultation with their advisor.

      ENGL 602 First Year Seminar
      ENGL 608 Bibliography and Literary Research
      ENGL 628 Literary Journal Editing
      ENGL 656 Composition Theory, Pedagogy and Administration
      ENGL 680 Theories of Gender
      ENGL 682 History and Criticism
      ENGL 683 Theory and Practice of Literary Criticism

    5. Dissertation Hours: [19 SCH]
      1. HISP 691

    Other Requirements

    Each Ph.D. student will be required to write a doctoral dissertation. Nineteen (19) SCH of dissertation credit (HISP 691 : "Research") are required.

    Each Ph.D. student will be required to demonstrate proficiency in a language other than English and Spanish by taking a translation exam (dictionary allowed) or by passing a 300-level class in that language with a grade of B or better. Students may satisfy this requirement at any point before completing their 45 SCH of regular coursework.

    Residency Requirement Requirement

    Residence requirements for the doctoral program can be satisfied by completing two consecutive semesters (at a minimum of nine resident credit hours each) either on campus or through distance education courses originating from the College Station campus and available at all System campuses.

    All students are expected to work under the continuous direction of their graduate committees.

    Transfer of Credits

    Texas A&M University, College Station permits the transfer of certain graduate level courses. That policy is set forth in the Texas A&M University Graduate Catalog.

    COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    1. Required Courses for all Ph.D. Students
      HISP 600 Introduction to Hispanic Studies. Credit 3. Examination from an interdisciplinary perspective of the cultural history of the Hispanic world, with particular emphasis on what the different disciplinary approaches reveal about literature, language, historical development and socioeconomic issues. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 601 Research, Theory and Writing. Credit 3. Orientation to traditional and new issues in advanced study of Spanish-language literature, linguistics, cultural studies; mechanics and ethics of scholarly procedure and bibliographical guidance on original research project; and individually tailored Spanish-language writing practicum. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 620 Studies in Critical Theory. Credit 3. Examination of the development of theories of literary criticism and their application to the study of literary texts. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 625 U.S. Hispanic Literature and Culture. Credit 3. Study of the origins and evolution of U.S. Hispanic literature, culture and folklore, and U.S. Hispanic regional dialects. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.

      The following courses, taught at Texas A&M International University and at Texas A&M University-Kingsville, may be used in lieu of HISP 601:
      SPAN 5300 Theory of Literary Analysis Bibliographic Search, and Literary Writing Methods. Credit 3. The course is designed to acquaint graduate students before the end their third semester of graduate studies with the techniques of research and writing appropriate to the study of literature. Prerequisite: Graduate classification. [TAMIU].
      SPAN 6301 Research Methods. Credit 3. Orientation to critical proficiency and tools in literary theory, cultural studies approaches, and linguistic methods necessary for conducting research in the resolution of problems relevant to the study of the topic selected. Prerequisite: Graduate classification. [TAMU-K].
    2. Course for concentrations and free electives. To be chosen by a student in consultation with his or her graduate advisor and Ph.D. committee.
      HISP 602 Applied Linguistics for Teachers of Spanish. Credit 3. Overview of Spanish including regional and national variation with special reference to relationship of language acquisition, performance analysis and teaching methodology. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 603 Development of the Spanish Language. Credit 3. The origin and development of the Spanish language from pre-Roman to modern period with emphasis on the socio-historical contexts; analysis of literary and documentary evidence of linguistic evolution. Prerequisite: HISP 602 or approval of instructor.
      HISP 606 Spanish of the Southwest. Credit 3. Descriptive analysis of written varieties of southwest Spanish from Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. Structure and variation of (a) the sound system, (b) grammatical patterns, and (c) the lexicon. Instruction to sociolinguistic issues relevant to southwest language studies. Prerequisite: HISP 602 or approval of instructor.
      HISP 607 Seminar in Spanish Linguistics. Credit 3. Intensive investigation of an issue important to understanding historical linguistics, dialectology, sociolinguistics, developments in theoretical and applied linguistics. May be repeated for credit as content varies. Prerequisite: HISP 602 or approval of Instructor.
      HISP 614 Hispanic Dialectology. Credit 3. Topics include varieties of Spanish spoken throughout the Americas. Spanish-speaking regions covered include South America, the Caribbean, Central America, and North America, including the southwestern United States. The course covers historical background, structural linguistics, and sociolinguistic issues (social and stylistic variation). Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 618 Hispanic Folklore and Popular Literature. Credit 3. An examination of popular literature and other cultural forms in the Hispanic world. Students will learn to appreciate, evaluate, and compare written and oral-traditional formats, and acquire methods of analyzing language and cultural artifacts that reflect recent research trends. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 630 Studies in Latin American Literature. Credit 3. Possible topics include colonial literature, the chronicles, Romanticism, Modernism, contemporary trends in the Latin American novel, the novel of the Mexican Revolution, Ruben Dario, contemporary Argentine fiction, the literature of revolution in Latin America, Afro-Hispanic literature, Hispanic Caribbean literature. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 640 History of Ideas in Hispanic World. Credit 3. Intensive study of cultural and ideological currents, especially as they are reflected in the works of essayists and other writers. Possible topics include Spain and European culture, European thought in Latin America, the Renaissance in Spanish literature and social life, Spain and the Western tradition, Spain between Islam and Christianity, the search for national identity in Mexico, three intellectual generations in Argentina, the development of Hispanic nationalism in the United States, the history of Hispanic journalism in the United States. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 645 Hispanic Women Writers. Credit 3. A study of the development of writing by women in the Hispanic world, including Spain, Latin America, and the United States. Topics include identity and nation, building of a feminine aesthetics, the reception of works by women writers, literary canons and exclusion, women and/in the Latin American boom, Latina writers in the United States. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 646 Cultural Encounters and Borders in Hispanic Literature. Credit 3. Topics include literature and marginalization in medieval Spain, colonial literature and the chronicles, Modernism, Vanguardism, contemporary trends in the Latin American novel, the novel of the Mexican Revolution, Afro-Hispanic literature, Hispanic Caribbean literature. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 650 Methods of Study in Spanish Linguistics. Credit 3. Examination of various methods of linguistic analysis in Spanish, such as transformational grammar, socio- or psycholinguistics in Spanish. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 653 Don Quixote and the Hispanic Novel. Credit 3. Analysis of Cervantes's Don Quixote and the development of modern fiction, its influence in the Hispanic narrative tradition, from Fernández de Avellaneda to Pérez Galdós, G. García Márquez, and Carlos Fuentes, and its presence in the U.S. Hispanic novel. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 660 Reading and Research in Hispanic Cultural Studies. Credit 3. Independent research in specialized subjects not normally or not often included in the regular course offerings. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 664 Hispanic Theatre. Credit 3. Topics include Golden Age drama and its antecedents, the Neo-Classicist movement in Spain, regionalist and criollo drama in Latin America, avant-garde and collective creation theatre, Teatro Campesino and Chicano movement drama, Hispanic performance artists. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 665 Studies in Spanish Literature. Credit 3. Topics include El Cid, El Arcipreste de Hita, El Romancero, Spanish Renaissance poetry, Golden Age prose, Golden Age theater, Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Góngora and Gongorismo, eighteenth-century essayists, Galdós, the Generation of 98, Romanticism, Miguel de Unamuno, the theater of Garcia Lorca, contemporary Spanish poetry, Spanish literature after Franco. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 667 Hispanic Genre Studies. Credit 3. Selected topics in the works, authors, characteristics and classifications of a given genre cultivated by Hispanic writers. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 670 Studies in U.S. Hispanic Literature. Credit 3. Topics include bilingual literature, Nuyorican literature, Cuban American literature, Chicano literature, the immigrant novel, ethnic autobiography, U.S. Hispanic theater, Chicano theater. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 671 Bilingualism in Hispanic Literature. Credit 3. This course will explore bilingualism in Hispanic letters. From Spanish medieval literature to contemporary Hispanic literature in the United States, the course will focus on artistic, aesthetic, social, historical, and cultural aspects of the uses of two languages in Hispanic literary works. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 672 Hispanic Film and Performance Arts. Credit 3. A theoretical and historical exploration of cinema and performance arts in the Hispanic world. The description and interpretation of films and performance arts such as flamenco and folkloric ballet with particular attention to history, ethnology, artistic trends, and tendencies and relationships to other arts. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 675 Methods of Teaching Spanish to Native Speakers. Credit 3. Presentation of the various theories and methods for the teaching of Spanish to students of Spanish-speaking backgrounds in the United States. Prerequisite: HISP 602 or approval of instructor.
      HISP 685 Directed Studies. Credit 1 to 4 each semester. Readings to supplement the student's knowledge of Hispanic Studies in areas not studied in other courses; research papers. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Approval of department head.
      HISP 689 Special Topics in... Credit 1 to 4. Selected topics in an identified area of Hispanic Studies. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 691 Research. Credit 1 or more each semester. Research for thesis or dissertation. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Approval of department head.

      Texas A&M International University courses:

      HISP 6305 Seminar in Golden Age Literature. Credit 3. A seminar in a special topic on the poetry, drama, and prose of the Golden Age. May be repeated when topic changes. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 6313 Seminar in Modern Peninsular Literature. Credit 3. A seminar in a special topic concerning modern Spanish letters. Topics may focus on genres, authors, themes, or historical, cultural, and aesthetic movements. May be repeated when topic changes. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 6339 Seminar in the History of Spain. Credit 3. A seminar in the history of Spain with special emphasis on historical, political, religious, and cultural issues of relevance to an understanding not only of Spain but of Spanish America. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 6343 Special Topics in Hispanic Literature and Culture. Credit 3. A seminar dealing with diverse themes and currents in the literature of Spain or Spanish America. The focus may be a genre (the pastoral), a theme (the portrayal of women), or cultural/cross-cultural issues in Hispanic letters. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      HISP 6344 Seminar in Modern Spanish American Literature. Credit 3. A seminar in Latin American Literature after independence. Topics will vary, and may include the novel, short story, poetry, theatre, or themes prevalent in Spanish American literature, such as civilizacion-barbarie, revolution and society, race and gender, and social justice. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.

      Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi courses:

      SPAN 5320 Seminar on Peninsular Literature. Credit 3. Detailed studies concentrating on themes, specific authors and literary movements. May be taken more than once when topics vary.
      SPAN 5330 Seminar in Spanish-American Literature. Credit 3. Detailed studies concentrating on themes, specific authors and literary movements. May be taken more than once when topics vary.
      SPAN 5340 Seminar in Spanish Linguistics. Credit 3. Detailed aspects of Spanish linguistics, such as history of the Spanish language, dialectology, sociolinguistics, morpho-syntax, Spanish in the United States, bilingualism, or Spanish of the Americas. May be taken more than once when topics vary.
      SPAN 5396 Individual Study. Credit 1 to 3. A carefully planned special study on an academic topic not offered as part of the regular graduate curriculum. Directed Individual Study (DIS) is a tutorial, directed and evaluated by a member of the graduate art faculty. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students who have demonstrated both academic ability and the capacity for independent work. Prerequisites: 1) At least six semester hours of graduate course work in the field at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. 2) A minimum GPA of 3.0 on all work in the field at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. 3) At least one previous course with the supervising instructor. A maximum of six semester hours of 5396 may be counted towards the graduate degree.
      SPAN 5699 Workshop in Spanish. Credit 1 to 6. Consideration of current problems and approaches in Spanish language, literature or teaching. May be repeated when topics vary.

      Texas A&M University-Kingsville courses:

      SPAN 6300 Topics in Spanish. Credit 3. Research methods and theory in the field of Spanish linguistics. Topics: Dialectology, phonetics, semantics, pragmatics, Spanish of the Southwest, methods of study in Spanish language. May be repeated when topic changes. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      SPAN 6301 Research Methods. Credit 3. Orientation to critical proficiency and tools in literary theory, cultural studies approaches, and linguistic methods necessary for conducting research in the resolution of problems relevant to the study of the topic selected. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      SPAN 6310 Hispanic Feminist Theory and Writing. Credit 3. Analysis of Hispanic women's discourse as power struggle for the elaboration of feminist politics of reason, passion, and action, and political feminist consciousness. Critical analysis of women's writings as production and reproduction of cultural formations of historically situated and gender-specific discursive subjects. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      SPAN 6311 Hispanic Film Studies. Credit 3. Study of Latin American, U.S. Latino, and Spanish film and multimedia as historical and cultural active re-discoveries and re-constructions of the Hispanic people and their worlds. Readings and discussion on the articulation between history, film, multimedia, and the production-consumption of image cultures in the Hispanic world. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      SPAN 6341 Topics in Translation Studies. Credit 3. Applied linguistics issues related to Spanish-English/English-Spanish translation. May be repeated when topic changes. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      SPAN 6350 Hispanic Cultural Studies. [Various Topics] Credit 3. Study of cultural constructs and practices in the Hispanic World. Interpretation of Hispanic signifying practices, institutions, subjectivities, ideologies, gender roles and the Other. Critical analysis of the interactions among high culture, mass media, and popular culture. May be repeated when topic changes. 01.Hispanic Cultural Studies; 02.Hispanic Cultures of Politics; 03.Hispanic Signifying Practices; 04.Hispanic Culture. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      SPAN 6361 Spanish-American Vanguardism. Credit 3. Study of center-periphery theoretical encounters of the creacionista, ultraísta, constructivist, and surrealist writing techniques used by Spanish-American writers from the 1920s to the 1940s. Assessment of the ambivalence between acceptance and rejection of the avant-garde by Latin American poets; and the singularity of the major works identified with the avant-garde. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.
      SPAN 6362 Spanish-American Postmodernism. Credit 3. A study of the intersections of high culture and popular culture, global designs and local histories, border thinking and globalization in the literary genres of the Spanish-American postmodernist period. Insight into various aspects of power-subordination relationship of Hispanic and world cultures. Critical analysis of their aesthetic, social, and political functions and contexts. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.

    Funding Your Graduate Studies, Research and Travel

    Most of our students receive either teaching or research assistantships to help fund their studies in our program. There are other external sources that can also be utilized for this. Likewise, there are numerous sources for funding your research and travel to conferences.

    Departmental sources

    Other sources at Texas A&M University (conference and research travel, thesis/dissertation)

    External sources: Research and Thesis/Dissertation

    External sources: Graduate school funding

    Frecuently Asked Questions

    Frequently asked questions about the Graduate Programs in the Department of Hispanic Studies:

    1. GENERAL QUESTIONS
      1. What is a collaborative Ph.D. program?
      2. Which of the four institutions grants the degree?
      3. Is the Ph.D. program available to places other than College Station, Laredo, Kingsville and Corpus Christi?
      4. Are there plans to expand the program to other locations in Texas or around the country?
      5. Are summer courses offered?
    2. DELIVERY OF COURSES
      1. Is the Ph.D. program an online program?
      2. What is TTVN and how does it work?
    3. APPLICATION PROCESS
      1. Where can I find an application?
      2. Where do I submit transcripts and test scores?
      3. When are the deadlines for applying to the Ph.D. program?
      4. Do I need an MA in Spanish or Hispanic Studies to apply for entry into the Ph.D. program?
      5. Do I need an MA to apply to the Ph.D. program?
    4. THE PH.D. PROGRAM
      1. How long does it take to finish the Ph.D.?
      2. Are there funding opportunities for students in the Ph.D. program?
      3. How many hours of graduate credit can I transfer if accepted into the Ph.D. program?
      4. Is there a foreign language requirement for the Ph.D. program?



    The following information should be consulted after reading through the information available elsewhere on this website.

    1. GENERAL QUESTIONS
      1. What is a collaborative Ph.D. program? Our Ph.D. in Hispanic Studies is a Ph.D. program involving faculty and departments at four Texas A&M University system campuses: Texas A&M University ( College Station), Texas A&M International University ( Laredo), Texas A&M University-Kingsville, and Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Students are based at one of these four campuses but, through the use of Televised Teleconference Video Network (TTVN), enroll in available courses at any of the other three participating institutions.
      2. Which of the four institutions grants the degree? Texas A&M University ( College Station) is the degree granting institution.
      3. Is the Ph.D. program available to places other than College Station, Laredo, Kingsville and Corpus Christi? No, the Ph.D. program is a collaborative program involving the A&M campuses in College Station, Laredo, Kingsville and Corpus Christi. All students must declare a home campus when applying and must be physically present at this location for the delivery of courses.
      4. Are there plans to expand the program to other locations in Texas or around the country? There has been informal mention of this possibility, but there is nothing concrete yet.
      5. Are summer courses offered? Yes, but courses offered may vary during the Summer semesters.
    2. DELIVERY OF COURSES
      1. Is the Ph.D. program an online program? No, the Ph.D. program is delivered via live feed at specific class times and only to specific locations. Our courses are not stored and are not available online for students to log on at their leisure.
      2. What is TTVN and how does it work? TTVN stands for Trans-Texas Videoconference Network. This is the method we use to transmit and deliver courses to and from participating campuses. It works much like any live video feed one might see on a live news broadcast on television. The professor in charge of a course convenes with local students in a classroom equipped with monitors, cameras, and microphones. Students in remote sites attend a similarly equipped classroom (with monitors, cameras, and microphones) and join up with the professor and other students at other sites for lecture, discussion, and intervention. All students, whether locally or at the remote sites, have equal opportunity to intervene, ask questions, give oral presentations, etc. Delivery via TTVN is quite interactive and works best when all parties involved are active participants.
    3. APPLICATION PROCESS
      1. Where can I find an application? Texas A&M University does not use paper applications any longer. All candidates for admission must access and file the application online at http://www.applytexas.org/ . Please note that beyond the application itself, this site allows for the submission of the Statement of Purpose, Letters of Recommendation and Spanish Writing Sample. These documents are able to be uploaded through the "supporting documents" link on your Apply Texas application site. Please also send electronic copies of these documents directly to the Director of Graduate Studies at h-kallendorf@tamu.edu. Transcripts and test scores pertaining to your admission must be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records at the College Station campus.
      2. Where do I submit transcripts and test scores? These materials must be sent directly to the following address:
        Texas A&M University:
        Office of Graduate Admissions
        P.O. Box 40001
        College Station, TX 77842
        Texas A&M International University:
        José Cardona López
        Dept. of Language and Literature
        Texas A&M International University
        5201 University Blvd.
        Laredo, TX 78041
        Texas A&M University - Kingsville:
        Michelle Johnson Vela
        Texas A&M University-Kingsville
        Department of Language and Literature
        P.O. Box 162 , Station 1
        Kingsville, TX 78363
        Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi:
        Jesús Rosales
        Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi
        College of Arts and Humanities
        6300 Ocean Drive
        Corpus Christi, TX 78412
      3. When are the deadlines for applying to Ph.D. program? We only accept students into the Ph.D. program for entry in the Fall of each year. These applications are due in mid December.
      4. Do I need an MA in Spanish or Hispanic Studies to apply for entry into the Ph.D. program? No, MAs in related fields are also eligible. These related fields are: Anthropology, Education, English, History, Latin American Studies, Mexican American Studies, Political Science, and Sociology. Please note, however, that all candidates must have sufficient contact with the Spanish language in an academic setting.
      5. Do I need an MA to apply to the Ph.D. program? No. If accepted, students who have not earned an MA in a related field will be required to complete 96 credit hours (students with an MA in Spanish or Hispanic Studies have a 64 hour requirement). Students with an MA in a related field may be required added credit hours if their experience in the field of Hispanic Studies is deemed limited by the admissions committee.
    4. THE PH.D. PROGRAM
      1. How long does it take to finish the Ph.D.? Full time students must enroll in 9 credit hours per semester. Depending on your academic history, the Ph.D. requires between 64 and 94 credit hours. Students accepted with a BA must take 94 hours, 75 of which must be taken in regular courses and the remainder in research hours. Students accepted with an MA may need as little as 64 hours, 45 of which are taken in regular courses and the remainder in research hours. Students with a BA can expect to take 4 years to fulfill the course requirements, plus the time it takes to write a dissertation. Students with an MA who are required to take 64 hours can take 2.5 years to satisfy course work plus the time it takes to complete a dissertation. These calculations do not consider course work done in the summer.
      2. Are there funding opportunities for students in the Ph.D. program? Yes, beyond the competitive fellowships made available at the University level, the Department of Hispanic studies offers two possibilities for funding: Teaching Assistantships or Research Assistantships. Typically, both of these assistantships require that a student work 20 hours per week and they include health insurance. All students holding assistantships in the Department of Hispanic Studies are also eligible for participation in Texas A&M's tuition payment program, which covers the cost of tuition.
      3. How many hours of graduate credit can I transfer if accepted into the Ph.D. program? Ph.D. students may be allowed to transfer up to a third of the required number of hours for their degree. Only courses taken in residence at an accredited U.S. institution or approved international institution with a final grade of B or better will be considered for transfer credit.
      4. Is there a foreign language requirement for the Ph.D. program? Yes. Students must prove some degree of competency in a language other than English and Spanish by either passing a translation exam or passing a 300-level language course with a grade of B or better.